Tag Archives: water

Reflection and Vision

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne!

The familiar lyrics to this song, long associated with bringing in the New Year, reminds us that 2014 has come to an end and 2015 is just begun. For me, this is a time to look back at the year that’s passed, and to look to the future.

2014 was an important year for JB Dondolo. So much has happened. First of all, while JB Dondolo was founded in 2013, it took until the third quarter of this year for us to get our 501c3 status. Because we are now officially a charitable organization, we’ve been able to register on Causes.com. So far, we’ve been able to raise $1,500 in cash donations and have been busy sending out grant inquiries and grant letters to help us achieve our vision.

That doesn’t happen easily. In fact, it’s taken a lot of time and effort to set up our campaigns online, to kick them off, create an e-Newsletter to communicate with our supporters, and to create a blog to educate people about JB Dondolo, Inc. as a charity and to spread our message. This has taken the effort of ten volunteers, and I am immensely thankful for their support.

In order for us to take care accomplish our first mission, we will need another $9,500 and many more volunteers to help us. Once we raise these funds through donations, we’ll begin with painting the walls, replacing windows, doors and the roof of the Igusi Hospital. Only then can we install a clean water system for the Hospital.

One way that we’re raising funds is through sales of our charity bracelets and t-shirts. When you purchase our bracelet, you show your support for our organization. Wearing our bracelet can also encourage conversation, and makes it possible for you to “Tell One – Save Lives” by telling one person about the meaning of the bracelet and asking them to buy one and tell a friend to do the same.

2014 has been a fabulous year for me personally as well. I’ve been featured on CNBC.com, Bloomberg Businessweek, Black Enterprise, Yahoo Finance and the Boston Globe. I hope that your 2014 has been everything you wanted it to be.

As we begin the New Year, I’d like to wish you a very Happy 2015. Please, take a moment and share with us one of your highlights from the past year and one of your dreams for the new year.

Advertisements

How Water Scarcity Impacts on Rural Zimbabwe Residents and Health

Water. It’s something that we in the Western Hemisphere take for granted. It’s easy to turn on the tap to get safe, clean drinking water. But what if your water supply suddenly ran dry? What if your water was making you (and your loved ones) sick? What would you do?

In rural Zimbabwe, this is more than just a rhetorical question. Water security is an issue that everyone is concerned about. In 2011, the government of Zimbabwe invested in having boreholes drilled to access water, especially for rural communities. However, of the 266 holes that were drilled, only 80 of them are currently functioning at full capacity, while most operate at much lower levels, especially during drought periods.

In the Nayamandlovu area, where the JB Dondolo organization is working to refurbish the Igusi Hospital, much of that water is being drawn away to Bulawayo, a city of more than 653,000 people. This is problematic because rural communities are then left with less water to care for the community.

This scarcity causes residents to prioritize what they will do with their water. Their first priority is having water for drinking and cooking. Water scarcity causes sanitation problems as people often opt not to perform certain duties in order to preserve what little water they have. They don’t wash their bodies or their clothes, and choose to relieve themselves in public rather than using a flush toilet. This problem of using public spaces for relieving oneself is partly what was linked to the outbreaks of typhoid and cholera in 2010.

Having access to plentiful and safe drinking water makes it possible for families to feed their families and to maintain hygiene. It also makes it possible for them to plant native plant species which are high in nutrients and also to help them care for small livestock, which helps alleviate poverty.

Our most critical need for the Igusi Hospital is to be able to provide the community with clean water. The Igusi School next door shares the same water line as the Hospital. However, that water is heavy with lime, and could easily be contaminated.

JB Dondolo’s fundraising efforts right now are focused on obtaining the equipment to suppress lime from the source water, to purify it so that it can be used in the hospital, and to have a safe, clean water delivery system implemented into the Hospital.

How can you help?

Please donate to JB Dondolo to help us finish the work that our father started!